Apologies for our silence….

We have been busy in NYC introducing Leave it to Barcelona to the city. A big thank you to No 8 NYC for hosting us and Life Ice for the Leave it to LifeIce cocktails.  Meanwhile we were able to raise invaluable funds for Women for Women International through our generous donors.

See below for photos of the fantastic evening

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Colleen Abuhaidar wearing Barcelonas best from head to toe.

!LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Joanna Gonzalez. Women for Women International representative.

Joanna Gonzalez. Women for Women International representative.

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

John Meadow of LDV Hospitality

John Meadow of LDV Hospitality

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

A special thank you to James Brosnan and Christophe Jammet who helped create our web site and incorporate the site!  Speical thank you to James Brosnan for working so hard on our website and incorporating the blog and Christophe Jammet founder of Sparkify.  

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Paulette Fox (Founder of Life Ice), Erica Gragg (Founder of Escape to Shape) and Sarah Purcell (of Sarah Purcell Pilates)

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

A Life Ice cocktail at No.8 NYC

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Leave it to Barcelona

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Women for Women International Silent Auction

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Auction Items

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Colleen Abuhaidar founder of Leave it to Barcelona with Paulette fox of Life Ice

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Life Ice silent 4 pack, generously donated for the silent auction

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Will Torress (Founder of WillSpace NYC) Walid Abuhaidar (Owner of Scarpetta NYC) and Colleen Abuhaidar (Founder and Owner of Leave it to Barcelona)

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

Will, Walid, Colleen and Michael Yadgard (Principal of Maxwelle NY)

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

LEAVE IT TO BARCELONA Introduction to NYC by COLLEEN ABUHAIDAR

What is Doga anyway?

In our instagram posts in the past we have referred to “doga,”  which we consider to be doing yoga with your dog.  Many places around the United States offer classes for owner and pet so your furry friend can join in on the fun.

When my dog sees my yoga mat come out, he recognizes that it is at least a bit of time where he can relax next to me….so extended shavasana perhaps?

We take Doga very lightly, however, it can be a much more spirtual pursuit between you and your furry friend if you wish.

Do you Doga?  We would love to see your photos!  Send us a message here, email us, or leave a message on our Leave it to Barcelona facebook page!

“Doga (a portmanteau of “Dog Yoga”) is the practice of yoga with pet dogs.

Through acts of meditation, gentle massage, and stretching, doga practitioners seek to achieve a greater harmony with their dogs. Canine acupuncture and chanting are also known to take place within the occasional doga routine.

In Doga, the submissive dogs and their human masters work as one unit – the masters help their dogs facilitate different poses and, in some cases, the pets are used as props or instruments while the masters perfect their poses. This is seen to be a Zen way of practicing non-traditional yoga and training, while exploring power play dynamics.

Doga has received some criticism from the yoga community.[1] Doga classes have been labeled inappropriate for trivializing the sacred practice by turning it into a “fad”, for their lax policies on teacher certification, and for the dogs’ interference in participants’ concentration and relaxation when they are not properly trained to cooperate.[1]

The UK charity Dogs Trust have also warned that unsupervised Doga may impact the welfare of the dogs, stating: “It is important to remember that dogs can’t tell us when they have had enough. Doga, and any variation of it, should always be carried out under the watchful eye of trained professionals”.[2]

Doga enthusiasts have argued[1] that the practice emphasizes yoga’s focus on union between beings, helps establish a pack mentality, strengthens the bond between owner and pet, and can provide additional weight resistance thereby intensifying one’s yoga ritual. Doga can purportedly also provide a great source of entertainment for dog-friendly class members.”

(www.wikipedia.com)

A little meditation (Not our dog) (A true Dogi)

Ensuring that Sarahs abs are strong enough to teach Pilates. ;) (Ensuring Sarahs abs are strong enough)

Adding a little extra weight to help the stretch.... (Lending a little extra weight to assist)

Watching the progress.... (“Its all about progress”)

Relaxing.... (lounging)

IMG_4213 (Practicing the art of mindfulness)

Downward  Dog (Downward Dog)

Easy as pie…pizza pie!

While maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle let me it stated that I love pizza as much as the next person…though, as its not the healthiest of options I try my best to avoid it.

Recently, I came across a wonderful cookbook co-written by Mimi Spencer…The Fast Diet Cookbook.

“Enjoy delicious low-calorie meals that can help you lose weight, become heart-healthy, and lower your risk of major diseases.

The FastDiet became an instant international bestseller with a powerful life-changing message: it’s possible to lose weight and reduce your risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, all while eating what you would normally eat five days a week. You simply cut your caloric intake two days a week to 500 calories for women, 600 for men. Now, the FastDiet Cookbook offers 150 nutritious, low-calorie recipes, ranging from simple breakfasts to leisurely suppers, enabling you to incorporate the FastDiet into your daily life. With this indispensable companion book, you will never have to worry about planning your fast days again!”

I don’t cut my calorite intake two days a week as I’m not dieting, but I LOVE the recipes.  This past weekend we made Mimis Tortilla Pizza…major calorie cutting, and majorly delicious.

Have a look at how easy it is…and for more delicious recipes like this check out The Fast Diet cookbook…fast and easy recipes for those on the go!

We certainly did!

We certainly did!

We found that popping in the oven before adding the sauce allowed them to stay a little extra crispy once we added our homemade tomato sauce.

We found that popping in the oven before adding the sauce allowed them to stay a little extra crispy once we added our homemade tomato sauce.

It is so easy and fast!  Simmer onions and garlic, then add tomatoes.  Your sauce will be ready in under half an hour.  If you are pressed for time search for an organic sauce to add.

It is so easy and fast! Simmer onions and garlic, then add tomatoes. Your sauce will be ready in under half an hour. If you are pressed for time search for an organic sauce to add.

I generally reach to the bottom of my tomato stash and take the less desirable tomatoes to add to my sauce..  In this batch I used 2 heirloom tomatoes.

I generally reach to the bottom of my tomato stash and take the less desirable tomatoes to add to my sauce.. In this batch I used 2 heirloom tomatoes.

photo 2

I prefer a hand machine however you can use a cuisine art, blender...whatever you need!

I prefer a hand machine however you can use a cuisine art, blender…whatever you need!

We may have over crispified ours...that said, it was still delicious!

We may have over crispified ours…that said, it was still delicious!

Mimi offers healthier alternatives...as I had just finished a 12 hour workout week and Walid pushing 20 we opted for the higher calorie option of cheese.

Mimi offers healthier alternatives…as I had just finished a 12 hour workout week and Walid pushing 20 we opted for the higher calorie option of cheese. 

We added spinach to add a little color and greens into our dinner.

We added spinach to add a little color and greens into our dinner.

 

 

 

Bicicleta Modernisme

As some of you may have seen via our facebook or instagram pages this Sunday we met up with our friend Carlos, and hit the streets for the Bicicleta Modernisme sponsored by the Modernist Museum of Barcelona. To clarify for ourselves, and for those who may not have been entirely clear, we took to wikipedia to differentiat Catalan modernism from the other Modernist movements which happened around the world. See below for a few photos of our fun filled evening.

“Modernisme (Catalan pronunciation: [muðərˈnizmə], Catalan for “modernism”), also known as Catalan modernism, is the historiographic denomination given to an art and literature movement. Its main form of expression was in architecture, but many other arts were involved (painting, sculpture, etc.), and especially the design and the decorative arts (cabinetmaking, carpentry, forged iron, ceramic tiles, ceramics, glass-making, silver and goldsmith work, etc.), which were particularly important, especially in their role as support to architecture. Modernisme was also a literary movement (poetry, fiction, drama). Although it was part of a general trend that emerged in Europe around the turn of the 20th century, in Catalonia the style acquired its own unique personality. Its distinct name comes from its special relationship, primarily with Catalonia and Barcelona, which were intensifying their local characteristics for socio-ideological reasons after the revival of Catalan culture and in the context of spectacular urban and industrial development. It is equivalent to a number of other fin de siècle art movements going by the names of Art Nouveau in France and Belgium, Jugendstil in Germany, Sezession in Austria, Liberty style in Italy and Modern or Glasgow Style in Scotland, and was active from roughly 1888 (the First Barcelona World Fair) to 1911 (the death of Joan Maragall, the most important Modernista poet). The Modernisme movement was centred in the city of Barcelona, though it reached far beyond, and is best known for its architectural expression, especially in the work of Antoni Gaudí, but was also significant in sculpture, poetry, theatre and painting. Notable painters include Santiago Rusiñol, Ramon Casas,[1] Isidre Nonell, Hermen Anglada Camarasa, Joaquim Mir, Eliseu Meifren, Lluïsa Vidal and Miquel Utrillo. Notable sculptors are Josep Llimona, Eusebi Arnau and Miquel Blai

Santuari de Santa Maria Magdalena, by José Sala, in Novelda, Valencian Community

Catalan nationalism was an important influence upon Modernista artists, who were receptive to the ideas of Valentí Almirall and Enric Prat de la Riba and wanted Catalan culture to be regarded as equal to that of other European countries. Such ideas can be seen in some of Rusiñol’s plays against the Spanish army (most notably L’Hèroe), in some authors close to anarchism (Jaume Brossa and Gabriel Alomar, for example) or in the articles of federalist anti-monarchic writers such as Miquel dels Sants Oliver. They also opposed the traditionalism and religiousness of the Renaixença Catalan Romantics, whom they ridiculed in plays such as Santiago Rusiñol‘s Els Jocs Florals de Canprosa (roughly, “The Poetry Contest of Proseland”), a satire of the revived Jocs Florals and the political milieu which promoted them.

Modernistes largely rejected bourgeois values, which they thought to be the opposite of art. Consequently, they adopted two stances: they either set themselves apart from society in a bohemian or culturalist attitude (Decadent and Parnassian poets, Symbolist playwrights, etc.) or they attempted to use art to change society (Modernista architects and designers, playwrights inspired by Henrik Ibsen, some of Maragall‘s poetry, etc.)

Architecture and the plastic arts[edit]

The earliest example of Modernista architecture is the café Castell dels tres Dragons designed by Lluís Domènech i Montaner in the Parc de la Ciutadella for the 1888 Universal Exhibition. It is a search for a particular style for Catalonia drawing on Medieval and Arab styles. Like the currents known in other countries as Art Nouveau, Jugendstil, Stile Liberty, Modern Style or Sezessionstil, Modernisme was closely related to the English Arts and Crafts movement movement and the Gothic revival. As well as combining a rich variety of historically-derived elements, it is characterized by the predominance of the curve over the straight line, by rich decoration and detail, by the frequent use of vegetal and other organic motifs, the taste for asymmetry, a refined aestheticism and dynamic shapes.[2]

Antoni Gaudí is the best-known architect of this movement. Other influential architects were Lluís Domènech i Montaner and Josep Puig i Cadafalch, and later Josep Maria Jujol and Enrique Nieto.[3]

While Barcelona was the centre of Modernista construction, the Catalan industrial bourgeoisie built industrial buildings and summer residences – cases d’estiueig – in many Catalan towns, notably Terrassa and Reus. The textile factory which is now home to the Catalan national technical museum MNACTEC is an outstanding example.

Literature[edit]

In literature, Modernisme stood out the most in narrative. The nouvelles and novels of decadent writers such as Prudenci Bertrana (whose highly controversial Josafat involved a demented priest who ends up killing a prostitute), Caterina Albert (also known as Víctor Catala), author of bloody, expressionistic tales of rural violence, opposed to the idealisation of nature propugned by Catalan Romantics, or Raimon Casellas have been highly influential upon later Catalan narrative, essentially recovering a genre that had been lost due to political causes since the end of the Middle Ages. Those writers often, though not always, show influences from Russian literature of the 19th Century and also Gothic novels. Still, works not influenced by those sources, such as Joaquim Ruyra‘s slice-of-life tales of the North-Eastern Catalan coast are perhaps even more influential than that of the aforementioned authors, and Rusiñol’s well-known L’Auca del Senyor Esteve (roughly “The Tale of Mr. Esteve”; an auca is a type of illustrated broadside, similar to a one-sheet comic book) is an ironic critique of Catalan bourgeoisie more related to ironic, pre-Realist Catalan costumisme.

In poetry, Modernisme closely follows Symbolist and Parnassian poetry, with poets frequently crossing the line between both tendencies or alternating between them. Another important strain of Modernista poetry is Joan Maragall‘s “Paraula viva” (Living word) school, which advocated Nietzschean vitalism and spontaneous and imperfect writing over cold and thought-over poetry. Although poetry was very popular with the Modernistes and there were lots of poets involved in the movement, Maragall is the only Modernista poet who is still widely read today.

Modernista theatre was also important, as it smashed the insubstantial regional plays that were popular in 19th century Catalonia. There were two main schools of Modernista theatre: social theatre, which intended to change society and denounce injustice—the worker stories of Ignasi Iglésias, for example Els Vells (“The old ones”); the Ibsen-inspired works of Joan Puig i Ferreter, most notably Aigües Encantades (“Enchanted Waters”); Rusiñol’s antimilitaristic play L’Hèroe—and symbolist theatre, which emphasised the distance between artists and the bourgeoisie—for example, Rusiñol’s Cigales i Formigues (“Cicadas and Ants”) or El Jardí Abandonat (“The Abandoned Garden”).

Linguistics[edit]

Modernista ideas impelled L’Avenç collaborator Pompeu Fabra to devise a new orthography for Catalan. However, only with the later rise of Noucentisme did his projects come to fruition and end the orthographic chaos which reigned at the time.

The end of Modernisme[edit]

By 1910, Modernisme had been accepted by the bourgeoisie and had pretty much turned into a fad. It was around this time that Noucentista artists started to ridicule the rebel ideas of Modernisme and propelled a more bourgeois art and a more right-of-center version of Catalan Nationalism, which eventually rose to power with the victory of the Lliga Regionalista in 1912. Until Miguel Primo de Rivera‘s dictatorship suppressed all substantial public use of Catalan, Noucentisme was immensely popular in Catalonia. However, Modernisme did have a revival of sorts during the Second Spanish Republic, with avant-garde writers such as Futurist Joan-Salvat Papasseit earning comparisons to Joan Maragall, and the spirit of Surrealists such as Josep Vicent Foix or Salvador Dalí being clearly similar to the rebellion of the Modernistes, what with Dalí proclaiming that Catalan Romanticist Àngel Guimerà was a putrefact pervert. However, the ties between Catalan art from the 1930s and Modernisme are not that clear, as said artists were not consciously attempting to continue any tradition.

Modernista architecture survived longer. The Spanish city of Melilla in Northern Africa experienced an economic boom at the turn of the 20th century, and its new bourgeoisie showed its riches by massively ordering Modernista buildings. The workshops established there by Catalan architect Enrique Nieto continued producing decorations in this style even when it was out of fashion in Barcelona, which results in Melilla having, oddly enough, the second largest concentration of Modernista works after Barcelona.

UNESCO World Heritage[edit]

Some of the works of Catalan Modernism have been listed by UNESCO as World Cultural Heritage:

Architects[edit]

There were more than 100 architects who made buildings of the Modernista style, three of whom are particularly well known for their outstanding buildings: Antoni Gaudí, Lluís Domènech i Montaner and Josep Puig i Cadafalch.

  • Antoni Gaudí, who went beyond mainstream Modernisme, creating a personal style based on observation of the nature and exploitation of traditional Catalan construction traditions. He was using regulated geometric shapes as the hyperbolic paraboloid, the hyperboloid, the helicoid and the conoide.[6]
  • Lluís Domènech i Montaner created a genuine alternative architecture. Along with Josep Vilaseca i Casanovas he worked towards a modern and international style. Domènech continued on from Viollet-le-Duc, his work characterized by a mix of constructive rationalism and ornaments inspired in the Hispano-Arab architecture as seen in the Palau de la Música Catalana, in the Hospital de Sant Pau or in the Institut Pere Mata of Reus.[7] His Hotel Internacional at Passeig de Colom in Barcelona (demolished after the 1888 World Fair) was an early example of industrial building techniques.
  • Josep Puig i Cadafalch was a Catalan architect, politician and historian who was involved in many projects to retore older buildings. One of his most well-known buildings is his rebuilding of the Casa Amatller in Passeig de Gràcia. It has elements in both the Catalan tradition and others originating in the Netherlands or the German Gothic. Neo-Gothic is also apparent in his Codorniu Winery (Caves Codorniu, 1904). He built Casa Amatller and Casa Trinxet.”

www.wikipedia.com

Saturday night carbo loading in our new outfits.

Saturday night carbo loading in our new outfits.

Just before the bike ride began in front of the gorgeous UNESCO world heritage sight the Hospital Sant Pau.

Just before the bike ride began in front of the gorgeous UNESCO world heritage sight the Hospital Sant Pau.

Making our way with Carlos

Black and white in El Born

(photo credit: Tomas Carcasona)

(photo credit: Tomas Carcasona)